Organisation and the classroom

Organisational environment and its impact on curriculum in the context of embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives in the school requires additional strategies.

Timetables, resources, facilities, professional development and program flexibility are all factors that can impact on the successful delivery of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives.

Strategies

  • Open door policy—maintaining an open door policy where parents and community members can drop in and be a part of the class and school environment will enhance relationships with both  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous communities.
  • Program flexibility—this offers non-Indigenous staff the ability to adjust and redevelop work programs and support materials to ensure Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives are embedded within school practices. From an administrative perspective, curriculum mapping provides a good indication of the explicit nature of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives within current work programs. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander perspectives are complex and dynamic; pedagogy and curriculum should be flexible and responsive to community needs.

Organisational environment guiding questions

Consider the following questions to guide the planning process.

  • What changes in the school environment would assist in the delivery of this unit?
  • What barriers may I face in embedding this knowledge into my curriculum?
  • In what ways will I need the school to support the involvement of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people within this unit of work?
  • What similar units have this school and other schools attempted? What can I learn from them?
  • Are there any sensitive issues that administration may need to know about?
  • Will I need an Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander person to work with my class at any point during this unit?
  • What will prevent Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander  engagement within this unit?
  • What training might Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community members or Indigenous Education Workers (IEWs) need to support my unit?
  • What school processes will I need to protect the intellectual property (the cultural and local knowledge belonging to a particular area or group of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander peoples) rights of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are working with me?
  • Where can I find assistance within the department for checking whether the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander knowledge presented in this unit is culturally appropriate?
  • How will the success of this unit be shared, promoted or publicised?
Last updated
10 September 2014