Personal local area histories

The personal history of the local area affects the understanding of the local environment and the attitudes and perceptions of local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non-Indigenous people, and of the school’s position in the local area.

The local environment/region contains evidence of:

  • ancestors
  • creation times
  • time before time
  • the relationships between the sky, landforms, waterways, plants, animals and people
  • relationships between other Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander groups
  • language use over time, of colonisation, loss, change, life stories, family histories and current realities.

A rich tapestry of knowledge exists to describe the local area from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ perspectives that extend back generations, through more than 120 000 years of occupation.

Both Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Indigenous people within Queensland have had differing levels of contact with each other. This contact created a shared history of the local area that continually influences the peoples, the landscape and the school.

A limited understanding of the local history makes it impossible to understand the current local context and position of Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples.

A clear understanding will create a strong picture of how the school developed within this complex history, and how various peoples perceive it.

Non-Indigenous histories

The framework supports non-Indigenous educators as professionals to reflect on their understanding of their own history and cultural perspectives. This will help in understanding how personal attitudes and perceptions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples form.

It helps to reflect on personal behaviours and how they have an impact upon Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, particularly students.

Cultural backgrounds, religious belief, family histories and individual experiences (including those with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples) will also affect the attitudes and perceptions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

Non-Indigenous people have various stories and narratives that represent a collective world view of mainstream Australia. Non-Indigenous people represent many cultural backgrounds and countries of origin other than Australia. These countries, including the religious and cultural values, continue to influence individuals and families.

These factors contribute to the diversity of non-Indigenous cultural histories and may reveal:

  • class difference and privilege, which may be based on the acquisition of land
  • negative interactions with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people during non-Indigenous settlement of the local area
  • racist attitudes held by family or the wider community
  • activism and support on Indigenous land rights
  • influence/acceptance of Indigenous values, cultural practices and languages.
 

 Related information

 
A rich tapestry of knowledge exists to describe the local area from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’ perspectives that extend back generations, through more than 120,000 years of occupation.
Last updated
16 July 2014